Upcoming talk – Small Fish in a Big Pond: The Pure Rivers Society, Water Pollution and Britain’s Second World War

Gary Willis, a PhD student in environmental history at the University of Bristol and friend of the Environmental History Workshop, will be giving a talk on his research into water pollution in Britain during the Second World War at the University of Greenwich. The below is taken from the talk’s Eventbrite page, where free tickets can be reserved:

History & Environment Talk

Thursday 13 February 2020, 5.45pm

You are warmly invited to hear a talk by Gary Willis (University of Bristol):

Small Fish in a Big Pond: The Pure Rivers Society, Water Pollution and Britain’s Second World War

Gary Willis recently discovered the archives of the “elusive” Pure Rivers Society in deepest Herefordshire. What does this tell us about Second World War era water pollution and the challenges of historical research?

Gary Willis had a first career in international development charities and the trade union movement. Having always been interested in the environment, British history and the Second World War, he undertook a MRes in Historical Research at the Institute of Historical Research in London, and is now in the third and final year of a PhD at the University of Bristol, looking at the impact on the British landscape of the Second World War. He published an article in Rural History in October 2018: ‘”An Arena of Glorious Work”: The Protection of the Rural Landscape against the Demands of Britain’s Second World War Effort.

Refreshments are available.

The talks are free and public.

The History & Environment Talks are presented by Raphael Samuel History Centre, the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Greenwich Maritime Centre at the University of Greenwich.

 

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